Initiating New Employees

Published by Mike Michalowicz (Google+)

Here are some ways that can help you get your new employees off to a great start:

 

        Celebrate their arrival. Most employers have a going-away party, but you need to have a welcome party! This will help set the tone, make them feel special, and give everyone a chance to meet the new team member.

        Advance notice. Let them know ahead of time if there is anything they should be aware of, such as where to park, your smoking policy, or how to dress. This can help prevent uncomfortable situations from arising.

        Be prepared. Before they start work, have all the paperwork done. The first day should be about meeting people and getting integrated, not doing paperwork. You should also have the materials in place that they will need to do their job, like business cards.

        Be there. Greet them as soon as they come in. Then start taking them around for a tour and to meet people. And, in addition to being there, make sure you greet the person by name, and act as if you were eagerly awaiting their arrival. The new employee will not feel very valued if they walk in and have to explain who they are and why they are there.

        Heads up. Let the new employee know what to expect that day. It is weird enough, starting a new job, but when you add not knowing what to expect, all day, it can make matters worse. Let them know how you see the day playing out.

        Time matters. Especially on the first day, try to avoid keeping them late. As it is, they have taken in a lot and will need some time to decompress. The last thing they need is to have to put in extra time when they are just starting.

        Pair up. Trying pairing up the new employee with someone who knows the company well and is a good role model within your business. That way, there will be a dedicated person they can go to, when they have questions. And that buddy can also try to help them feel more at ease, along the way.

        Go easy. Especially on the first day, avoid information overload. Too much information given to the new employee at once will just overwhelm them. On the first day, keep it simple. You will have plenty of time later for loading your new employee up with information. But the first day is not the time for it.

        Follow up. At the end of the first day, or week, ask the new employee for feedback to see how they feel about the position, how they are settling in, whether there is anything they need, etc.

 

Settling In
One of the most important things you can do, to get employees off to a great start, is to give them the proper training they need to do the job you have hired them to do. Many people leave positions because they feel they are not receiving the proper training, which can make someone feel overwhelmed and stressed out.

 

The more you can do to welcome the employee and make them feel comfortable, the better start they will experience. And that’s a good thing for both your new employee and your business! From giving them a company shirt or hat to throwing a pizza party lunch for their first day, there are many things you can do to help get the ball rolling in a successful direction.

 

 

By Mike Michalowicz, Author of The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur

Category: Big Success Stories, Exceeding Expectations, Getting Clients
Tags: , , , , .
  • Steve

    Good article.  My current company welcomes new employees by gathering everyone in the lobby (about 80 people) and introducing the new employee.  They have a couple welcome traditions like a company cheer too.  As a relativley new employee, it was a little embarrassing, but while you don’t really get to meet everyone there, it’s a great way for the rest of the team to find out who the new guy in the building is.  That’s far better than my last job.  I got sent to an out of state office on day one, alone to go meet the guy who’s job I was taking over.  Would have been nice if he knew I was replacing him.  He wasn’t let go, just transferred to a different position but he had no idea I was coming to spend two weeks being trained by him.